By Robert Cohen Executive Director Text Only

H = Heart Disease


Heart disease is America's number one killer. Most American's and scientific agencies are in agreement: Saturated animal fat and cholesterol do not do the heart any good. According to USDA figures, each day, the average American eats just 5 ounces of meat and chicken containing saturated fat and cholesterol, and 29.2 ounces of milk and dairy products (666 pounds per American) containing the same dangerous factors. The following nine studies are a confirmation to milk's link to heart disease:


"Milk and milk products gave the highest correlation coefficient to heart disease, while sugar, animal proteins and animal fats came in second, third, and fourth, respectively."

A Survey of Mortality Rates and Food Consumption Statistics of 24 Countries, Medical Hypothesis 7:907-918, 1981


"More patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction had elevated levels of antibodies against milk proteins than was found in a comparable group of patients without coronary heart disease."

Davies, Antibodies and Myocardial Infarction, The Lancet, ii: 205-207, 1980


"Milk consumption correlates positively with cholesterol levels in blood as well as coronary mortality. In comparisons between 17 countries, there is a good correlation between national cholesterol levels and mortality from ischaemic heart disease."

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 48:305-325, 1994


"Although studies point out strong negative correlations between wine consumption and heart disease... six countries with the highest mortality show no correlation at all. Finland ranks highest of all in milk consumption, wine consumption and mortality from heart disease."

The Lancet, I, 1017-1020, 1979


"Milk and many components of milk (butterfat, milk protein, calcium from milk, and riboflavin) were positively related to coronary heart disease mortality for all 40 countries studied."

Circulation 1993; 88(6):2771-2779


"Greenland Eskimos, who have a very low incidence of ischemic heart disease, have a high-fat, high-protein diet, but a very low intake of milk."

British J of Preventive & Social Medicine, 1977


"For ischemic heart disease milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+. In the case coronary heart disease, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65- 74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations...animal proteins contribute to homocysteine production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert homocysteine to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with homocysteine from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries."

Altern Med Rev, 1998 Aug, 3:4


"Excessive milk consumption may adversely affect the circulation on account of the high calcium content of milk and because lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of calcium. Excessive calcium intake may cause calcification and rigidification of the large elastic arteries, which could be an important factor in causing myocardial ischaemia."

Med Hypotheses, 2000 May, 54:5


"Animal food-groups were directly correlated to mortality from coronary heart disease, defined as sudden coronary death or fatal myocardial infarction and vegetable food-groups (except potatoes) as well as fish and alcohol were inversely correlated with CHD mortality. Univariate analysis showed significant positive correlation coefficients for butter (R = 0.887), meat (R = 0.645), pastries (R = 0.752), and milk (R = 0.600) consumption, and significant negative correlation coefficients for legumes (R = -0.822), oils (R = -0.571), and alcohol (R = -0.609) consumption. Combined vegetable foods (excluding alcohol) were inversely correlated (R = -0.519), whereas combined animal foods (excluding fish) were directly correlated (R = 0.798) with coronary heart disease death rates."

Eur J Epidemiol, 1999 Jul, 15:6, 507-15


MILK AND HEART DISEASE

Heart disease is America's number one killer. Dairy products
represent America's number one food group.

Charles Attwood, M.D., once described to me the pint of
blood he had drawn from a patient. In the hour before
parting with his pint, the young man had eaten lunch at a
fast food restaurant, enjoying hamburgers, fries, and a
milkshake.

The blood was "murky and opaque," according to Dr. Attwood.
I will always remember that phrase and Attwood's further
descriptive imagery. After 15 minutes, a one-half inch layer
of fat had risen to the top of the plastic package
containing that blood.

In 1980, the British journal Lancet (ii: 205-207) reported:

"More patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction had
elevated levels of antibodies against milk proteins than was
found in a comparable group of patients without coronary
heart disease."

In 1994, the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (48:305-
325) found:

"Milk consumption correlates positively with cholesterol
levels in blood as well as coronary mortality. In
comparisons between 17 countries, there is a good
correlation between national cholesterol levels and
mortality from ischaemic heart disease."

There is controversy regarding the "fat-connection" and
heart disease. Is it fat, or is it dairy, which also
contains fat? In 1977, the British Journal of Preventive &
Social Medicine noted:

"Greenland Eskimos, who have a very low incidence of
ischemic heart disease, have a high-fat, high-protein diet,
but a very low intake of milk."

The May, 2000 issue of Medical Hypothesis provided an
important clue as to how dairy compromises the heart:

"Excessive milk consumption may adversely affect the
circulation on account of the high calcium content of milk
and because lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of
calcium. Excessive calcium intake may cause calcification
and rigidification of the large elastic arteries, which
could be an important factor in causing myocardial
ischaemia."

This morning, I remembered Dr. Attwood's Blood sample
assessment while thumbing through a stack of reading
material on my desk. The Physician's Committee for
Responsible Medicine (PCRM) reports a second opinion that
confirms Dr. Attwood's observation.

The current issue of Good Medicine, PCRM's quarterly
journal, contains evidence that just one single meal
containing saturated animal fat can be harmful to the human
heart.

Neal Barnard, M.D., includes a column citing a study that
appeared in the Journal of American Cardiology (Nestel, PJ,
et, al., 2001; 37: 1929-35). PCRM reports:

"Australian researchers fed volunteers a ham and cheese
sandwich, a glass of whole milk, and a dish of ice cream.
Just hours later, their cholesterol levels were elevated,
and they experienced a 25-percent reduction in elasticity of
their arteries-both important risk factors of heart attack."

Was this experiment a fair assessment of America's favorite
fast-food meal?

PCRM reveals:

"The fat content of the experimental meal was 50 grams,
still well below that of a typical fast-food meal such as a
chicken sandwich and fries."


Robert Cohen author of:   MILK A-Z

(201-871-5871)
Executive Director (notmilkman@notmilk.com)
Dairy Education Board
http://www.notmilk.com



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